How to Cure a Slice

Matt Killen demonstrated a similar tip in the September, 2010 issue of Golf Digest

Image via Golf Digest

We all do it. The dreaded slice. As much as you may want to hit that ball straight, many golfers still experience that nasty curve; a killer to your confidence and not to mention your scorecard. In a 2006 golf.com poll, 70 percent of readers confessed that slicing is their greatest golf challenge. Sure slicing can be frustrating, but it can also be fixed. So before you pack away your golf clubs for good, you might want to keep reading.

Slicing is a very common shot in golf and the correction is surprisingly simple. The definition of a slice is a ball that curves to the right (for the right-handed player) or to the left (for the left-handed player).

Proper club set-up

Ready, aim, fire: Proper club set-up is the first step towards curing a slice

The first item that we check at Paradise Golf Academy is how the student aims the golf club.  Improper set-up is the first major slice culprit; this can lead to poor shots as well as developing bad habits like sloppy swing technique.  Slicing is caused by the club face being open to the target line (to the right or the left, depending on your dominant hand) through impact.

The proper method of aiming a golf club is to set the sole edge of the club flat on the ground with loft, having the bottom edge (also known as the leading edge) of the club so it’s perpendicular to your intended line of flight (also known as the target line). Some golf club manufacturers have even colored the bottom two grooves of the club to help golfers visualize this aiming technique.

Golfers should also make sure that the handle of the club (or the cap end of the grip) is even with the golf ball, or another perpendicular line from the target line through the ball. If the grip end is even with that line, then you know you have a well-aimed golf club.

If the golf club is aimed properly and you’re still slicing your shots, the next step would be to change the top hand grip position.  The grip, primarily the top hand grip, controls the club face which dictates the amount of curvature in your shots.

For the right-handed player: If your ball is curving to the right rotate your top hand position slightly to the right on the grip, which will strengthen your grip.  This will feel uncomfortable at first, and you may feel a bit of tension in your lead arm (your left arm) in the beginning but bear with it; the fruits of your new and improved grip will soon follow.  Once you feel comfortable with the adjusted grip, you will feel the club releasing, or turning over in the impact zone without any effort and your slice should start to disappear.

For the left-handed player: If your ball is curving to the left rotate your top hand position slightly to the left on the grip, which will strengthen your grip.  This will feel uncomfortable at first, and you may feel a bit of tension in your lead arm (your right arm) in the beginning but bear with it; the fruits of your new and improved grip will soon follow.  Once you feel comfortable with the adjusted grip, you will feel the club releasing, or turning over in the impact zone without any effort and your slice should start to disappear.

Give this a try and let us know how it goes in the comments section below!

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